Kenya, Kiunyu 250g
Kenya, Kiunyu 250g
Kenya, Kiunyu 250g
Kenya, Kiunyu 250g

Kenya, Kiunyu 250g

Vanlig pris 208,00 kr
Enhetspris  per 
Avgift inkludert. Frakt beregnes ved kassen.

Smak: Tranebær og appelsinblomst.

 Vi har en forkjærlighet for kaffe fra Kenya. Det er noe med de, og alle som liker Kenyask kaffe føler vi en oppgave om å fremstille de Kenyanske kaffene med ære og respekt.

Det er sent i sessongen for Kenya i disse dager, de jobber med foredling as we speak og de ferskeste batchene kommer inn på sommeren. Det man får i disse dager er litt mere elegante kopper, mot de virile crazy batchene som kommer inn på sommeren, og det er også et godt tegn. For man får litt andre smaker.

Når vi brenner denne kaffen er det viktig for oss å følge utviklen på kaffen, derfor vil det kanskje være litt variasjoner fra batch til batch, da vi stadig progressivt oppdager nye smaker som du kan få være med på. 

Litt om brenneprofilen.

Når vi brenner kaffen er det viktig for oss å følge utviklen på kaffen, derfor vil det kanskje være små variasjoner fra batch til batch, da vi stadig progressivt oppdager nye smaker som du kan få være med på. Vi brenner all vår kaffe på en single drum kaffebrenner hvor vi bruker vitenskapelig metode for å justere etter de parameterene som er relevate for å få frem smaken. All vår kaffe brennes i dag av Tony Jacobsen (grunnlegger av jacobsen og svart).

Kiunyu factory

Kiunyu factory processes cherry cultivated by farmers in Kiandumu in Kirinyaga county. The high altitudes of 1,650+ meters above sea level provide the warm days and cool nights that help nurture sweet, dense cherry. This coffee is fragrant with florals, sweet berries and black tea.

COFFEE GRADE: AA
FARM/COOP/STATION: Kiunyu washing station
VARIETAL: Batian, Ruiru 11, SL28, SL34
PROCESSING: Fully washed
ALTITUDE: 1,670 meters above sea level
OWNER: 3,825 farmers delivering to Kiunyu station
SUBREGION/TOWN: Kiandumu
REGION: Kirinyaga
FARM SIZE: 250 to 350 trees on average
AREA UNDER COFFEE: 221 hectares
BAG SIZE: 30kg GrainPro or Vac Pack
HARVEST MONTHS: Central Kenya: May – July (early crop) | October – December (late crop)

This Fully washed lot is cultivated by smallholders in Kirinyaga and processed at Kiunyu factory in Kiandumu. Farmers cultivate small farms of approximately 250 to 350 trees at altitudes of 1,650+ meters above sea level. The high altitudes provide the warm days and cool nights that help nurture sweet, dense cherry. This coffee is fragrant with florals, sweet berries and black tea. Kiunyu Factory is owned by Karithathi Farmers’ Cooperative Society (FCS).

Farmers delivering to Kiunyu can access lower-cost coffee and fruit tree seedlings and inputs, as well as lines of credit. Agronomists support each farmer with trainings, agronomic advice and more. Farmers also receive training on how to attain and maintain Rainforest Alliance certification.

Farmers receive technical agronomic support and soil sampling from Kahawa Bora. The soil sampling program addresses a key step in farmer profitability. Lower input costs mean lower overall production costs and higher profits. More targeted input application also translates into healthier trees and higher-quality cherry. Prior to Kahawa Bora’s soil sampling program, farmers had little access to soil analysis methods. Fertilizer, when applied, would be formulated according to a generalized recipe rather than one uniquely suited to the farm’s exact needs. With better access to information through technology and agronomical assistance, farmers can apply the right fertilizer recipe at the right time, improving yields and cherry quality.

Farmers delivering to Kiunyu cultivate primarily SL28 and SL34 in small coffee gardens that are, on average, smaller than 1 hectare. ‘SL’ varieties are cultivars originally released by Scott Agricultural Laboratories (SAL) in the 1930s and 1940s. They soon became the go-to trees for many growers in Kenya due to their deep root structure, which allows them to maximize scarce water resources and flourish even without irrigation. They are cultivated with a serious eye towards sustainability and Good Agricultural Practices, with minimal environmental impact where possible.

Batian is a relatively new variety introduced by the Kenya Coffee Research Institute (CRI) in 2010. Batian is named after the highest peak on Mt. Kenya and is resistant to both CBD and CLR. The variety has the added benefit of early maturity – cropping after only two years. Similar to Batian, Ruiru 11 is a new variety known for its disease resistance and high yields. It also starts yielding fruit after just 2 years.

Smallholders selectively handpick only ripe cherry and deliver it to Kiunyu Factory. At intake, the Cherry Clerk oversees meticulous visual sorting and floating, accepting only dense, ripe cherry.

After intake, cherry is pulped and fermented. Following fermentation, coffee is washed in clean water and laid to dry on raised beds. Workers rake parchment frequently to ensure even drying. They cover drying parchment during the hottest time of day, to maintain slow, even drying and at night, to shelter parchment from moisture.

Kenyan coffees are classified by size. AA beans are the largest size. AA grade coffees are those that are 17/18.5 screen size, meaning that they are larger than 7.2 millimeters.

Though coffee growing had a relatively late start in Kenya, the industry has gained and maintained a impressive reputation. Since the start of production, Kenyan coffee has been recognized for its high-quality, meticulous preparation and exquisite flavors. Our in-country sister company, Sucafina Kenya, works with farmers across the country to ensure these exceptional coffees gain the accolades they deserve.

Today, more than 600,000 smallholders farming fewer than 5 acres compose 99% of the coffee farming population of Kenya. Their farms cover more than 75% of total coffee growing land and produce nearly 70% of the country’s coffee. These farmers are organized into hundreds of Farmer Cooperative Societies (FCS), all of which operate at least one factory. The remainder of annual production is grown and processed by small, medium and large land estates. Most of the larger estates have their own washing stations.

Most Kenyan coffees are fully washed and dried on raised beds. The country still upholds its reputation for high quality and attention to detail at its many washing stations. The best factories employ stringent sorting practices at cherry intake, and many of them have had the same management staff in place for years.